The Causeway Coastal Route covers eighty miles of coastline across two counties, beginning in Belfast in the south-east of Antrim and ending in the Walled City in County Londonderry, in the north-west.

Along the way, there are fishing villages, quiet beaches, mountains and landscapes which poets and artists have celebrated in words and colour. Compare your visits to Carrickfergus and Cushendun with Louis MacNeice’s poems of the same names.

The route is easy to follow and the highlights include Giant’s Causeway, Carrick-a-rede Rope Bridge, Dunluce Castle, Glenariff Forest Park, White Rocks Beach and Londonderry. These places always bring thrills and memorable experiences but don’t just stay on the route. There are seven scenic and interesting loops to make off the path which take in areas of outstanding natural beauty: Torr Head, Slemish Mountain, Rathlin Island, Benone Beach, Cushendun and Binevenagh Mountain with remarkable views will inspire great memories.

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For wonderful beaches and stunning coastal views, Northern Ireland is hard to beat...

Northern Ireland surely has more museums per head of population than just about anywhere..

A visit to some of Northern Ireland’s historic houses is a great way to spend the day...

Northern Ireland has many superb examples of castles, fortifications and ancient religious sites...

Tariffs
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Teetering on the cliff edge, this romantic ruin was the 16th-century stronghold of the MacDonnells, a Scottish clan. They had a secret entrance through a sea cave. After a Spanish Armada treasure ship was wrecked in 1588 Sorley Boy MacDonnell got money to modernise
the castle.
The Causeway proper is a mass of 40,000 stone columns that form steps leading from the cliff foot and disappearing under the sea. Most of the columns are 6-sided and some are 40 ft tall. From the visitor centre a twomile circular walk takes you down to the Grand Causeway, on past majestic stone galleries and weird formation

The name means the rock in the road (or casting). For centuries salmon fishermen threw a rope bridge across
the scary gap each spring to give access to their fishery on the island. Now they do it with helicopters. There’s always a steady stream of visitors keen to cross over the bridge. The trick is: don’t look down......

Titanic Belfast extends over nine galleries, with multiple dimensions to the exhibition, drawing together special effects, dark rides, full-scale reconstructions and innovative interactive features to explore the Titanic story in a fresh and insightful way.